Want to know how Australia’s Threatened Species Strategy went over the last 5 years? Keep reading…but be prepared for disappointment…

Australia’s threatened species plan has failed on several counts. Without change, more extinctions are assured Euan Ritchie, Deakin University and Ayesha Tulloch, University of Sydney Australia is globally renowned for its abysmal conservation record – in roughly 230 years we’ve overseen the extinction of more mammal species than any other nation. The federal government’s Threatened Species … Continue reading Want to know how Australia’s Threatened Species Strategy went over the last 5 years? Keep reading…but be prepared for disappointment…

We’ve combined all of the available data on threatened plants to find out how they are doing – and the news isn’t great

Australia-first research reveals staggering loss of threatened plants over 20 years Ayesha Tulloch, University of Sydney; Elisa Bayraktarov, The University of Queensland; Hugh Possingham, The University of Queensland; Jaana Dielenberg, Charles Darwin University; Jennifer Silcock, The University of Queensland; Micha Victoria Jackson, The University of Queensland, and Nathalie Butt, The University of Queensland When it … Continue reading We’ve combined all of the available data on threatened plants to find out how they are doing – and the news isn’t great

Near-term ecological forecasts are valuable for managing threats to biodiversity

How can the scientific community provide the best available scientific predictions of what will happen in the future to managers and policymakers? This is the question that my colleagues Aaron Greenville, Valerie Hagger and myself decided to answer in our recently published paper,  Ecological forecasts to inform near-term management of threats to biodiversity in Global … Continue reading Near-term ecological forecasts are valuable for managing threats to biodiversity

New paper: Impact of 2019–2020 mega-fires on Australian fauna habitat

Reference: Ward M., Tulloch A. I. T., Radford J. Q., Williams B. A., Reside A. E., Macdonald S. L., Mayfield H. J., Maron M., Possingham H. P., Vine S. J., O’Connor J. L., Massingham E. J., Greenville A. C., Woinarski J. C. Z., Garnett S. T., Lintermans M., Scheele B. C., Carwardine J., Nimmo D. … Continue reading New paper: Impact of 2019–2020 mega-fires on Australian fauna habitat

Representing Queers in STEMM

I recently joined a group of four other talented Queers in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths and Medicine) to form the first QueersInScience Queensland Chapter. All of us have a common goal - helping LGBTQIA+ feel supported and safe in STEMM, educating (collaboratively) those that have influence, and fostering healthier work places and industries for LGBTQIA+ people in STEMM. We are hosting our inaugural Queensland QueersInScience event tonight so I thought it would be a great idea to introduce everyone in our team here!

Bringing people together during COVID-19 through citizen science

As Australians try to maintain social engagement during self-isolation, citizen science offers a unique opportunity. Citizen science allows everyday people to use technology to unite towards a common goal – from the comfort of their homes. From online protein folding games to backyard birding, citizen science is now offering a chance to contribute to research on the coronavirus pandemic.

How do we build society’s knowledge and engagement with our ecological systems? Read our article in The Conversation

Does your child know more about dinosaurs than dugongs? Perhaps they're reading the wrong books Flickr, CC BY-NC Ayesha Tulloch, University of Sydney and Kirsten Parris, University of Melbourne Identifying the difference between a native burrowing frog and an introduced cane toad is fundamental ecological knowledge. After bushfires ravaged Australia’s animal and plant communities and … Continue reading How do we build society’s knowledge and engagement with our ecological systems? Read our article in The Conversation

How to share data on species to help conserve them… whilst avoiding them being exploited by poachers

Most field ecologists spend a lot of time collecting valuable data on the locations of animals and plants, and other information critical for understanding a species' ecology such as where nests or breeding areas or essential food resources are located. Why do we need good data on where species live? Good data on populations of … Continue reading How to share data on species to help conserve them… whilst avoiding them being exploited by poachers

PhD top-up available on Threatened Ecological Communities and Fire

A PhD top-up stipend plus additional funding is available for an independent Australian domestic postgraduate to work with conservation practitioners and ecologists in both academia and the government on assessing the impacts of fire on threatened ecological communities to evaluate where and how to manage degraded communities. This opportunity is to conduct applied research intended to have real-world outcomes in terms of informing NSW Government priorities for protecting and managing threatened ecological communities.